The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

Skip to main content

Important Update


News

News from in the category of

Anthropomorphized Art Stars in Aldrich’s New Exhibit ‘Through the Eye of a Needle,' The Ridgefield Press

Sculptural artist Genesis Belanger made her solo show debut at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum on Sept. 21 with her haunting exhibition “Genesis Belanger: Through the Eye of a Needle.”


Still Life, Genesis Belanger Meditates on Mourning and Loss, Wallpaper Magazine

Genesis Belanger meditates on mourning and loss in Wallpaper's October issue.


Genesis Belanger: Through the Eye of a Needle, The Design Edit

Genesis Belanger's theatrical life-size tableaux blur the boundaries of art and design. he artist creates stage sets with furniture she builds to evoke loosely a nostalgic mid-century mood.


Dark Humor in the Lightest Pastels, White Hot Magazine

In her first major solo museum exhibition, Through the Eye of a Needle at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Genesis Belanger expands her iconic, domestic porcelain and stoneware objects that disavow glazes and anthropomorphize desires.


Sculptor Genesis Belanger Offers a Timely Reflection on Loss (and a Clever Critique of Capitalism), Vogue

Belanger riffs on the sorts of thoughtful-but-ultimately-tired gestures that people make in sympathy.


“My Favorite Artwork | Frank Stella,” T Magazine, March 18, 2020

The artist cites a painterly 19th-century landscape and a geometric 20th-century mural as influences on his own work.


“The Constellation of Frank Stella,” T Magazine, March 18, 2020

The artist’s Minimalist abstractions helped change the direction of his painting.


Rudy Shepherd Honors Police Brutality Victims, The Ridgefield Press

Through Nov. 29, the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield will display 25 watercolor paintings by Shepherd depicting the victims of police brutality and other race-related incidents.


Zoë Sheehan Saldaña: There Must Be Some Way Out of Here, Artforum

Titled “There Must Be Some Way Out of Here,” Sheehan’s exhibition prods at the relationship between artisanal craft and industrial production, and posits that the pairing might be uniquely American at heart.


Fluid Meaning: Zoë Sheehan Saldaña’s Hand Sanitizer Bridges an Understanding of Conceptual Art, Observer

Zoë Sheehan Saldaña: There Must Be Some Way Out of Here evokes a sense of urgency and taps into our current yearning for survival.


When Art Captures the Wind and the Rain—and a Bit of Ourselves, NRDC

“Weather Report” fills a Connecticut museum with the works of 25 artists who explore what’s happening in the atmosphere and, inextricably, to us.


Zoë Sheehan Saldaña and Glenn Adamson in Conversation, Sculpture Magazine

“There Must Be Some Way Out of Here,” on view at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum consists of some 50 handmade objects—“artistic camouflage,” as the museum puts it—that appear to be ordinary items one might find in any home.


Getting Your Weather Report at the Art Museum, Hyperallergic

At the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, artworks confront their own untimeliness through appeals to a deeper, more cosmic, sense of space and time.


Best Art of 2019, The New York Times

This was a year of highs that included political protest in the art world, a historic Whitney Biennial, inspiring monuments and a revamped MoMA.


Artists on the Verge of an Ecological Breakdown, Elephant

Over the years, many artists have have proven themselves to be staunch supporters of environmental campaigns.


New Aldrich Exhibit Explores the Concept of Safe Spaces, The Ridgefield Press

“Safe space” is a loaded term these days yet artist Zoë Sheehan Saldaña astutely mines this concept in all its paradoxes to create an exhibition that explores ideas of safe spaces and self-reliance.


Weather Report Exhibit at The Aldrich Goes Beyond Clouds and Rain, The Ridgefield Press

A diverse selection of art ranging from drawings and paintings to sculptures, videos and installations — all featuring weather as the thematic subject — is on view at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.


Harmony Hammond’s Art Is Bold and Prickly as Ever, The New York Times

Harmony Hammond, who began exhibiting and curating in the very early post-Stonewall years, was one of the people responsible for defying and reversing this repression.


Going Beneath the Surface, ARTnews

Hammond speaks with the conviction of someone who has been fighting for visibility in the art world—and beyond—for a very long time.


Harmony Hammond: Material Witness, Five Decades of Art, The Brooklyn Rail

Harmony Hammond proves that abstract art can be politically charged and bursting with content.