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Tim Prentice: Changing the Movement of Kinetic Art, Wallpaper*

Alongside Alexander Calder and George Rickey, Tim Prentice forged a new path in kinetic art. We spoke to the American nonagenarian artist and architect ahead of his major two-part exhibition, ‘After the Mobile’, at the Aldrich, Connecticut.


The Critics Notebook, The New Criterion

This week: On Tim Prentice, Chausson’s Le roi Arthus, Baroque set design & more.


Hugo McCloud in Whitewall

Using plastic to paint, draw connections, and ask questions.


Lucia Hierro: Con una Taza de Chocolate, Sculpture

Read about Lucia Hierro's work in Sculpture Magazine.


See New York Through the Eyes of Lucia Hierro, CULTURED

Lucia Hierro takes us on a Polaroid tour of her native New York including spots in Washington Heights, the Bronx and Brooklyn where she is currently based.


Lucia Hierro, Juxtapoz Magazine

A lone plastic shopping bag, plucked by the breeze, floats gracefully down the street. It is the “muse” of Lucia Hierro, who, although foremost an academic, is also a conceptual artist.


The Painterly, Provocative Art That Uses Humble Plastic Bags, The Wall Street Journal

Artist Hugo McCloud’s first solo museum show spotlights his creative turns.


Museum Shows With Stories to Tell, The New York Times

With summer on the horizon after a long pandemic winter, museums are throwing their doors open to tell every kind of story.


Artist Interview: Tim Prentice

Tim Prentice (b. 1930) is known for his innovative work in the field of motion in sculpture. Prentice has been a resident of Connecticut since 1975, and After the Mobile marks his first solo museum exhibition since 1999.


Artist Interview: Karla Knight

Karla Knight has spent the last forty years creating an impressive body of work that spans painting, drawing, and photography.


Frank Stella’s 56-Year History with The Aldrich

Since The Aldrich’s founding in 1964, Frank Stella has participated in fifteen group shows, and yet, Frank Stella’s Stars, A Survey marks the first exhibition dedicated solely to the artist at the Museum.


With The Aldrich Care Boxes, A Museum Proposes A Radical New Model, Forbes

During the pandemic, the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, has been experimenting with ways to bring art out of its white galleries, and into homes within the local community.


Stella On His Artistic Obsessions, CBS Sunday Morning

The 84-year-old abstract artist's giant star sculptures, now on display in Connecticut, exhibit a life of their own.


Genesis Belanger's Scrumptious Last Supper, Frieze

At the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, the artist's series of stoneware works offer a feminist critique of domestic life under the unmistakable presence of death.


Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum's New Program 'Blurs Lines' Between Gallery Space and Home, The Ridgefield Press

A world without art would be a gloomy and dreary place and while art lovers can visit some museums or take a virtual stroll through exhibitions, the COVID-19 pandemic has distanced many not just from their social circles but also from art.


In Frank Stella’s Constellation of Stars, a Perpetual Evolution, The New York Times

An exhibition in Connecticut unites two dozen works featuring a single motif, reaffirming the restlessness of this painter’s progress.


Artists Slow Time By Drawing Out Events in 2020, The Art Newspaper

Two years ago, when The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, set about its exhibition planning for 2020, an obvious event to address was the US election.


The Visual Arts Museum Through the Screen of a Computer: Thoughts on Working at The Aldrich Virtually

In the midst of a wholly digital world, where all one has to do to see a work of art is perform a simple Google search, what is the role of the art museum? Education and Exhibitions intern, Anika Khakoo reflects on her virtual internship at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.


NBC CT Launches ‘Connecticut In Color,' NBC

Rudy Shepherd’s Somebody’s Child paints the portraits of victims in an effort to celebrate their humanity and mourn the loss of life.


Genesis Belanger: Through the Eye of a Needle, Brooklyn Rail

In Genesis Belanger’s exhibition Through the Eye of a Needle, curated by Amy Smith-Stewart, death is an expected, albeit uninvited, guest, at home in the affluent domiciles orchestrated here through tableaux and mise-en-scène.